Meditations from the Tantras CHAPTER SEVEN

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The limbic system also intensifies emotional responses to data that do not harmonize or fit in with previous

conditioning or memory. Thus if something happens to us that is unexpected or different from our previous experiences, the limbic system immediately creates an emotional reaction such as anger, stress etc. This eventually triggers off the adrenal glands, which release the hormone adrenaline into the blood system. This then makes the whole body tense; the heart beats faster, the respiration rate increases, and so on. It is in this state that many modern day people spend much of their lives, and this prolonged tension leads to all types of disease.
Yet, at the same time, a part of the limbic system called the septal region acts in the opposite direction. It reduces our emotional responses; it releases tension and creates relaxation of the whole body and mind. By meditation we can make the septal part of the limbic system operate for the predominant part or even all of our life. Under these conditions we live a life of relaxation, not laziness, enjoy life more, do our work more efficiently and are free of disease.
If one wants relaxation and a happy life, one must change the mind, not the outside world or other people. A happy and healthy life comes from changing the mind and its reactions to the outside world. One can spend the rest of one’s life seeking happiness in the outside world, but if the mind retains its present programming one will never find happiness; one will be chasing the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. Meditate and reprogram your mind if you want a healthy and disease-free life. Modify the mental program that was put into your brain by faults in your upbringing, as this is the cause of all your unhappiness.

The psychic realm of existence is a subject which generally causes great confusion to the average man, because most people cannot view it and at present the language contains very few precise, technical terms which can correctly be used to describe it. Happily, however, many first-line scientists in numerous countries are presently making constant breakthroughs in their research concerning the subtle realms, and with their discoveries the English terms for the phenomena which are being uncovered are, out of necessity, being created. We are certain that the day is not far off when psychic matters will form an important part of every man’s general knowledge, and when the psychic world will be commonly viewed by all people, using machines which are in prototype stage in many of the forward-looking research institutes around the world.
One of the basic premises of the system of yoga is that the universe exists simultaneously on a number of different levels of subtlety. Every object or being which exists on the physical plane has a corresponding form on the more subtle planes, and life and activity go on there in a manner which has many similarities to events of the ‘solid’ physical world.
It is said that matter which is made up of particles which are smaller than protons, electrons and neutrons and which has a basic rate of vibration faster than the speed of light, is psychic in nature. Additionally, there are

said to be planes which are more subtle than the psychic, but these cannot presently be defined using the terminology of the science of physics. The two most well-known of these higher planes are the mental and causal planes, which are experienced only by a person in the state of meditation before he transcends all existence whatsoever and enters into samadhi.
The plane directly above the physical level is the psychic realm of existence. It has many things in common with the physical world with which we are familiar, and most people naturally experience events from time to time which are taking place on the psychic plane. This occurs most often during the state of sleep or when a person passes out or experiences a severe physical or emotional shock. This spontaneous viewing of psychic events also takes place through the use of certain dangerous drugs, and spontaneous psychic awakening is the basis of intuition, so-called ‘spiritual experiences’ and visions.
The system of kundalini yoga, which is based on the teachings of the ancient tantric scriptures, encompasses many techniques which are intended to bring about a controlled awakening of psychic experiences within the practitioner. Although the psychic awakening is never considered to be a goal of sadhana by the serious practitioner of yoga, for he is more interested in spiritual unfoldment, it is an important level through which all aspirants must pass.
Many of the practices of kundalini yoga require the aspirant to view events taking place on the psychic plane.

In most cases, what these kriyas require is that one must view certain centres, known as chakras, which exist in his own psychic body, and also view the flow of subtle energy which takes place in the pathways (called nadis) connecting the psychic centres. Of course, not all people can view these psychic occurrences at will, and so the practices of kundalini yoga alternately allow the practitioner’s awareness to follow (or imagine) a group of specified physical centres and passages which are interrelated with and can trigger off the actual psychic centres.
The following is a description of the different psychic centres located within the psychic body of man, and energy passages in the physical body which are utilized in the practices given in this book for the awakening of psychic centres themselves.
The psychic centres
There are very many psychic centres, or chakras, although only eleven are of the utmost importance to the practitioner of yoga. Of these eleven centres, which we will now describe, the first eight are the major chakras located along the sushumna nadi and the last three are subsidiary trigger points used to stimulate the chakras. In the following descriptions we have first described the chakras as they appear in the psychic body, along with the mantras, animals and sensations associated with them. Additionally, we have also shown the physical areas which act as the ‘trigger points’ for these chakras, where the awareness must be placed during the yoga practices.

Mooladhara: Mooladhara chakra is positionally the lowest of the chakras and is known as the root centre. It is associated with the earth element in nature, and is the seat of the primal energy in man known as kundalini shakti or sexual/spiritual energy. Mooladhara is visualized in the form of a deep red lotus flower having four petals. On the petals the Sanskrit letters Vam, Sham, Sham, and Sam are written in black. In the centre of the lotus is an equilateral triangle pointing downwards, and within the triangle is a smoky coloured shivalingam encircled by a golden coloured serpent with three and a half coils.
Mooladhara chakra is presided over by the god Brahma, the creator of the universe and the goddess Dakini, who controls the element of skin in the body. The beeja (seed) mantra of the chakra is Lam and the animal or vehicle is the elephant, symbolic of the solidarity of the earth. By far the most important aspect of mooladhara chakra is that it is the seat of the primal energy, symbolized by a coiled serpent which unravels and travels upward through all the chakras via the sushumna nadi at the time of spiritual awakening.
The physical trigger for mooladhara chakra is different in men and women. In males this point is located at the perineum, the point directly between the genitals and anus. In females mooladhara is located at the back of the cervix, where the uterus and vagina join.
Swadhisthana: The literal meaning of swadhisthana is ‘one’s own abode’. It is the second chakra, associated with the unconscious mind, storehouse of the collective

Mooladhara: Mooladhara chakra is positionally the lowest of the chakras and is known as the root centre. It is associated with the earth element in nature, and is the seat of the primal energy in man known as kundalini shakti or sexual/spiritual energy. Mooladhara is visualized in the form of a deep red lotus flower having four petals. On the petals the Sanskrit letters Vam, Sham, Sham, and Sam are written in black. In the centre of the lotus is an equilateral triangle pointing downwards, and within the triangle is a smoky coloured shivalingam encircled by a golden coloured serpent with three and a half coils.
Mooladhara chakra is presided over by the god Brahma, the creator of the universe and the goddess Dakini, who controls the element of skin in the body. The beeja (seed) mantra of the chakra is Lam and the animal or vehicle is the elephant, symbolic of the solidarity of the earth. By far the most important aspect of mooladhara chakra is that it is the seat of the primal energy, symbolized by a coiled serpent which unravels and travels upward through all the chakras via the sushumna nadi at the time of spiritual awakening.
The physical trigger for mooladhara chakra is different in men and women. In males this point is located at the perineum, the point directly between the genitals and anus. In females mooladhara is located at the back of the cervix, where the uterus and vagina join.
Swadhisthana: The literal meaning of swadhisthana is ‘one’s own abode’. It is the second chakra, associated with the unconscious mind, storehouse of the collective

consciousness, of all samskaras and remote genetic memories. It is the centre of the most primitive and deep-rooted instincts, those animal drives which cause modern man so much pain and confusion. Swadhisthana chakra is visualized in the form of a vermilion lotus with six petals, upon which are written the Sanskrit mantras Bam, Bham, Mam, Yam, Ram, and Lam. In the centre of the lotus is a white crescent moon, and also the chakra’s beeja mantra Vam written in black.
Swadhisthana is presided over by Lord Vishnu, the preserver of the universe, and the goddess Rakini, controller of the element of the blood. The sensation of this chakra is that of drowsiness and it is related to the physical organs of reproduction and excretion.
The trigger point for swadhisthana is located at the level of the pubic bone or coccyx. It is generally visualized as being in a column, though for certain practices it is also felt in the front of the body at the pubic bone.
Manipura: Manipura literally means the ‘city of jewels’, and this chakra is the centre of heat, the fire pit. It is associated with vitality and energy, and is symbolized by the ram, a most fiery and aggressive beast. The deity of manipura is Rudra, the consumer or destroyer of the universe, and the goddess is Lakini, controller of the flesh element. Manipura chakra is visualized as a bright yellow lotus with ten petals on which are written the Sanskrit mantras Dam, Dham, Nam, Tam, Tham, Dam, Dham, Nam, Pam and Pham. Within the lotus is an inverted red triangle with the beeja mantra Ram.

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